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6 Must-See Venice Neighborhoods and How to Visit


Venice Neighborhood Guide
Hi, I'm Theodora!

A freelance writer and recovering nomad, Theodora divides her time between Britain and Bali. With bylines including CNN, BBC, the Guardian, Discover, Lonely Planet, and National Geographic Traveler, she’s working on a book, still blogs once in a while at EscapeArtistes.com, and spends far too much time on Twitter.

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For more than 1,000 years, Venice has been divided into six key sestieri (districts): San Marco, San Polo, Dorsoduro, Castello, Cannaregio, and Santa Croce. But among these are a wealth of smaller neighborhoods and islands. Here are six areas every traveler in Venice needs to know.


Murano

For artisan goods and beautiful snaps.

One of a cluster of islands to the north of the city proper, Murano is actually a series of smaller islands linked by bridges. Artisans have created handblown glass here since the 13th century, and you can still watch craftsmen in action to this day.

Burano

For IG-worthy pics and delicate textiles.

Farther north still of Venice, Burano is famous for its artisan lace—and an Instagram must-visit for its candy-colored houses. Shopping and photos are the main attractions here.

Murano is well-known for its beautiful glassware. Photo: Silvia Longhi / Viator

Jewish Ghetto

For great food and Venetian history.

Between the 16th and 19th centuries, a section of Cannaregio was reserved for Jewish people. Despite the devastation of the Nazi occupation, the Venice Jewish Ghetto still home to historic synagogues, pawn shops, and more, as well as kosher restaurants and eateries serving Venetian Jewish favorites.

San Marco

For the best of Venice in one convenient location.

The beating heart of Venice, San Marco is home to the city’s top sights: St. Mark’s Basilica, St. Mark’s Square, the Doge’s Palace, La Fenice Opera House, and much, much more. It’s also the city’s shopping capital, with local crafts and international brand names sitting side by side on its charismatic streets.

San Marco Square is one of Venice's top attractions. Photo: Silvia Longhi / Viator

San Polo

For small but mighty appeal.

The smallest of the city’s sestieri, San Polo runs along the Grand Canal. Highlights here include the Rialto Bridge, the Frari Church, and the historic Rialto Fish Market.

Cannaregio

For fantastic food and transport connections.

The biggest and most populated of Venice’s neighborhoods, Cannaregio houses the train station, the Venice Jewish Ghetto, and a wealth of backstreets and squares. Less crowded than the more central districts, it’s also an excellent foodie destination.

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Hi, I'm Theodora!

A freelance writer and recovering nomad, Theodora divides her time between Britain and Bali. With bylines including CNN, BBC, the Guardian, Discover, Lonely Planet, and National Geographic Traveler, she’s working on a book, still blogs once in a while at EscapeArtistes.com, and spends far too much time on Twitter.

Keep exploring
See all Venice tours
1,276 tours & tickets
Things to do in Venice
See all things to do in Venice
How to Experience the Venice Carnival
How to Experience the Venice Carnival