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Columns of San Lorenzo (Colonne di San Lorenzo)
Columns of San Lorenzo (Colonne di San Lorenzo)

Columns of San Lorenzo (Colonne di San Lorenzo)

Corso di Porta Ticinese, Milan, Italy

The basics

The columns of San Lorenzo were likely moved to their current location facing the Basilica di San Lorenzo in the fifth century when the church was completed. Walking and bike tours of the vibrant Ticinese and adjacent Navigli districts in the center of Milan include a stroll along Corso di Porta Ticinese past this well-preserved colonnade. Both of these trendy neighborhoods are known for their restaurants and nightlife, so take an aperitivo tour to enjoy the area’s historic highlights together with its excellent food scene.

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Things to know before you go

  • Corso di Porta Ticinese along the Colonne di San Lorenzo is paved and closed to traffic, so easy to manage with a wheelchair or stroller.
  • Roman history enthusiasts will especially enjoy visiting this striking row of ancient columns.
  • If exploring the Ticinese or Navigli neighborhoods on a walking tour, you will be spending significant time on your feet. Choose comfortable shoes and dress for the weather.
  • Be sure to wear clothing that covers your shoulders and knees if planning to visit the Basilica of San Lorenzo, just opposite the colonnade.
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How to get there

It's a short walk from Piazza del Duomo to the Colonne di San Lorenzo along Corso di Porta Ticinese opposite the Basilica di San Lorenzo. Milan is one of Italy’s most important northern cities, well-connected by direct train to Venice, Florence, and Rome.

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Trip ideas

How to Spend 2 Days in Milan

How to Spend 2 Days in Milan


When to get there

The Colonne di San Lorenzo are outdoors, so best visited in summer or on clear days in winter. The columns are lit at night and make for striking photos during an evening walk through the city.

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Highlights of the Ticinese Neighborhood

One of the oldest in Milan, the Ticinese neighborhood is crisscrossed by Via Torino and Corso di Porta Ticinese, taking its name from the historic city gate marking the southern end of the district. Home to Milan's best-preserved Roman ruins, the Basilica of San Lorenzo and the Basilica of Sant'Eustorgio, the neighborhood is known for its shops, restaurants, and cafés.

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Frequently Asked Questions
The answers provided below are based on answers previously given by the tour provider to customers’ questions.
Q:
What are the nearest attractions to Columns of San Lorenzo (Colonne di San Lorenzo)?
Q:
What else should I know about attractions in Milan?
A:
As well as visiting the Columns of San Lorenzo (Colonne di San Lorenzo), check out these trip ideas to make the most of your visit: