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Paseo de la Reforma
Paseo de la Reforma

Paseo de la Reforma

Free admission
Paseos de la Reforma No. 42, Ciudad de Mexico, D.F., Mexico

The Basics

Designed to rival the European boulevards, Paseo de la Reforma was originally commissioned by Emperor Maximiliano I in the 19th century. Most travelers prefer to soak in the sights and sounds of Paseo de la Reforma on foot. Several guided walking tours cover some or all of the street's 9.3 miles (15 kilometers), while convenient hop-on hop-off bus services also run the length of the thoroughfare.

Alternatively, visit on a Sunday morning when the avenue is often closed to cars and explore by bike, admiring landmarks like the Diana the Huntress Fountain and bright yellow El Caballito sculpture along the way.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • Paseo de la Reforma is a regular site of protest and visitors should exercise caution if planning to attend.

  • Every Sunday morning, the street closes to traffic and transforms into a free cycleway.

  • The best views over Paseo de la Reforma are found at Chapultepec Castle.

  • Paseo de la Reforma is wheelchair and stroller accessible although uneven sidewalks can sometimes pose a problem.

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How to Get There

Paseo de la Reforma connects Chapultepec Park to the historic center of Mexico City and is easily accessed by public transit. The Chapultepec (Line 1) and Auditorio (Line 7) metro stations are both situated along Paseo de la Reforma, while the Metrobus Line 7 runs along much of the street.

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When to Get There

Paseo de la Reforma is a destination that can be enjoyed year-round, although it’s perhaps most enjoyable on weekends and during public holidays. On Sunday mornings, Paseo de la Reforma is closed to cars and becomes a public cycleway.

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Explore Chapultepec Park

Paseo de la Reforma leads directly to and through Chapultepec Park, a vast urban green space known as the lungs of Mexico City. Visitors can easily spend a day wandering the park’s winding paths, attending pop-up markets, and rowing on the lake. However, you should also stop by the Tamayo Museum of Contemporary Art and Chapultepec Castle for stellar views over Paseo de la Reforma.

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Frequently Asked Questions
The answers provided below are based on answers previously given by the tour provider to customers’ questions.
Q:
What are the nearest attractions to Paseo de la Reforma?
Q:
What else should I know about attractions in Mexico City?
A:
As well as visiting the Paseo de la Reforma, check out these trip ideas to make the most of your visit: