Recent Searches
Clear
Dzibilchaltún
Dzibilchaltún

Dzibilchaltún

Yucatan, Mexico

The Basics

Once home to nearly 20,000 inhabitants, Dzibilchaltún means "place where there is writing on the stones" and dates from the mid-Preclassic to the Postclassic period. Visit independently and learn about Mayan culture at the Mayan People Museum, wander the expansive grounds, and cool off in the Xlacah Cenote.

Alternatively, explore Dzibilchaltún as part of a guided excursion and maximize your time in the region without worrying about transportation. Tours typically run from both Progreso Cruise Port and Mérida and often include stops at Progreso and other nearby beaches.

Show all

Things to Know Before You Go

  • Dzibilchaltún is a quieter alternative to Chichén Itzá, ideal for history buffs short on time.

  • Entrance to the archaeological site is free for Mexican nationals and permanent residents on Sunday.

  • There’s an on-site restaurant and gift store and guides can be hired at the site.

  • Wear comfortable shoes and light clothes as the site is spread out.

  • Dzibilchaltún is not fully wheelchair or stroller accessible due to several gravel paths.

Show all

How to Get There

Dzibilchaltún Archaeological Site and Museum is situated roughly 30 minutes outside of Mérida city center. While many tours offer round-trip transportation to the ruins, visitors can also arrive by private vehicle. Drive north on Highway 261 before taking the México 261 exit to Dzibilchaltún. There’s on-site parking available.

Show all


When to Get There

The archaeological ruins of Dzibilchaltún are typically open daily from 8am to 5pm. The on-site museum is generally open between Tuesday and Sunday from 9am to 4pm. Access to the ruins is free for Mexican nationals and residents on Sundays. Arrive early to beat the region’s stifling midday heat.

Show all

More Mayan Ruins

There are plenty of Mayan ruins for curious travelers to explore on the Yucatán Peninsula. After visiting Dzibilchaltún, stay in Yucatán State and visit Ek Balam and Uxmal. Quintana Roo also has some excellent Mayan options—if you don’t mind the crowds, Chichén Itzá is a must, while the popular cliffside ruins of Tulum offer some of the most striking views in the region.

Show all