Recent Searches
Clear
To limit the spread of the coronavirus, attractions may be closed or have partial closures. Please consult government travel advisories before booking. The WHO is closely monitoring the coronavirus and more information can be found here.

Things to Do in Krakow - page 2

Category

Podgórze
16 Tours and Activities

Podgorze is a district of Krakow on the southern bank of the Vistula River and at the base of Lasota Hill. It was originally a separate city, but in 1915, as the Austro-Hungarian Empire was beginning to collapse, the town was combined with Krakow. The neighborhood was home to a large Jewish population, and thousands of its residents were sent to concentration camps during World War II. Several signs of the neighborhood's past can still be found here. One significant memorial is Plac Bohaterow Getta (Ghetto Heroes Square), a monument using large metal chairs that commemorates the heroes of the ghetto and the victims of the Holocaust. This is where many waited to board trains that took them to Auschwitz and Birkenau concentration camps.

There are several other memorials including Eagle Pharmacy and Plaszow Camp Memorial. Schindler's Factory, which is now a museum, is also located in this district. This is the factory the movie Schindler's List was based on.

Read More
Krakow Ethnographic Museum (Muzeum Etnograficzne w Krakowie)
7 Tours and Activities

Found in buzzing Kazimierz’s former town hall—itself a creamy-hued Renaissance masterpiece—Krakow’s superb Ethnographic Museum (Muzeum Etnograficzne) should be on everyone’s itinerary. The museum covers the history and culture of rustic Poland through the ages, with detailed reconstructions of 19th-century peasant rooms, schoolrooms and rural kitchens. The museum also has a fine collection of traditional musical instruments, colorful folk costumes and day-to-day utensils used in leather making, wood carving and farming. The highlight of a visit, however, is the display of ornately decorated Nativity cribs called szopki, which are traditionally painted red, green and gold and resemble multi-tiered Orthodox churches.

Read More
Jan Matejko House (Dom Jana Matejki)
6 Tours and Activities

Welcome to Jan Matejko’s universe! The famous artist, counted among the most famous Polish painters, is celebrated for his vivid depictions of political and military events inspired from Polish history. Some of his most famous works include the Battle of Grunwald, Union of Lublin, Rejtan, as well as several portraits of Polish kings, which are exposed in various National Museums across Poland.

The three-story town house is where the painter used to work and live, and has been transformed into a biographical museum in the late 1800s, shortly after his death. The house is still adorned with artwork commissioned by Matejko himself, which is now particularly valuable, seeing as he was quite the collector. Hundreds of objects and trinkets that belonged to Matejko, collected throughout the years, make up the relatively small but highly significant collection.

Read More
Hipolit House (Kamienica Hipolitów)
5 Tours and Activities

The Hipolit House is a branch of the Historical Museum of the City of Krakow, containing recreations of townhouse interiors from the 17th to early 19th century. The house represents a typical home in Krakow from this time period. The outside of the building has a grand facade with a central entrance hall. A narrow staircase takes visitors to the upper floors of the three story house. Visitors can still see carefully preserved stucco decoration by Baldassare Fontana from the late 17th century on the first floor. The permanent exhibition, Bourgeois House, shows how the interiors of the homes changed over the centuries. Visitors can see from this exhibition how the former wealthy citizens of Krakow lived. Furniture, paintings, fabrics, decorations, antique clocks and watches, and a variety of other objects show how the inhabitants arranged their homes. Through these details, visitors can get a glimpse of what life was like for the upper class during the 17th to early 19th century.

Read More
Cricoteka (Centre for the Documentation of the Art of Tadeusz Kantor)
5 Tours and Activities

Krakow's CRICOTEKA Museum is a theater, exhibition space and bookshop dedicated to a bizarre brand of experimental theater and the local man who created it in 1955: avant-garde and controversial playwright, designer, director and artist Tadeusz Kantor. Visitors to the museum will walk through bizarre theater set designs with spooky mannequins, marionettes and costumes on display. There is also a gallery showing Kantor’s work in Ulica Sienna, which housed his theater company Cricot 2, as well as frequent temporary exhibitions of art inspired by his ideas.

A visit to the museum provides a change from the historical monuments and buildings of Krakow, showing a more contemporary side of the city. Visitors will enjoy the modern architecture of the museum—a former power station turned riverfront exhibition space with a rusted metal and black glass exterior—and great views of the city and Vistula River.

Read More
National Museum
5 Tours and Activities

The biggest museum in all of Krakow, the National Museum, is actually the regional (and most important) branch of Poland’s National Museum - There are over 21 departments in Krakow alone, made up of 12 conservation workshops, 2 libraries and 11 galleries, each divided by art period, for a grand total of over 780,000 artworks. The museum came to be after Henryk Siemiradzki, one of Poland’s most celebrated painters, offered one of his works to the city of Krakow; soon after, hundreds of other artists and collectors started doing the same – forcing the city to adopt a special motion to house this invaluable collection. By creating the museum, the Polish government wanted to promote the achievements of the Krakow artistic community and the fine arts in general to the people of Poland, and, later on, to visitors from around the world.

Read More
Archaeological Museum of Krakow (Muzeum Archeologiczne w Krakowie)
6 Tours and Activities

While not nearly as big as other archaeology museums in the world, that of Krakow’s has the particularity of being home to the world’s only Slavonic god to ever be unearthed – an 8-feet tall, 4-faced piece of stone. There are hundreds of other artifacts inside the museum, which offers fascinating information on the ancient people that once commanded Eastern Europe. The permanent collection consists of two exhibitions: one called Prehistory and the Early Middle Ages that focuses on the evolution of the Neanderthal cavemen to the early-medieval Poles, and another called Gods of Ancient Egypt displaying a mesmerizing collection of Egyptian antiquities. There is also a space reserved for temporary collections, which have gained quite a reputation throughout the years for being particularly interesting.

Read More

More Things to Do in Krakow

Józef Mehoffer House (Dom Józefa Mehoffera)

Józef Mehoffer House (Dom Józefa Mehoffera)

5 Tours and Activities

Often regarded as one of Poland’s finest artists, Jozef Mehoffer (who also happened to be a pupil of Jan Matejko) was a highly talented stained-glass artisan, whose works can now be admired in numerous churches in both Krakow and across Galicia. This is the house where he used to live and work until his death in 1946, along with other artists of the Young Poland movement at the turn of the 20th century.

The house is still decorated with Mehoffer’s tasteful Art Deco furniture, Japanese treasures, iconographic trinkets, and impressionist artworks; as such, it offers an authentic glance of what life was like in a bourgeois house at the time, kind of like a time capsule. The house itself is in remarkable condition and features hundreds of rose bushes; in fact, the Jozef Mehoffer House is known for its beautiful garden-café, Meho Café, one of Krakow’s best kept secrets.

Learn More
Gallery of 19th-Century Polish Art (Galeria Sztuki Polskiej XIX Wieku w Sukiennicach)

Gallery of 19th-Century Polish Art (Galeria Sztuki Polskiej XIX Wieku w Sukiennicach)

5 Tours and Activities

The very aptly named museum, which is located inside Krakow’s famous Cloth Hall, does indeed focus on 19th-century Polish art, with thousands of paintings and sculptures on display – thus making it the largest of its kind in the world. As it mainly consists of donations from local collectors and artists, the exhibit is rather small in size when compared to other national galleries in the world but is nonetheless quite significant in terms of Polish art. The various artworks are scattered across four different “19th-century salon”-themed halls, each named after a prominent Polish artist and defined by a specific historical period.

The Bacciarelli Room is all about Classicist, Rococo and even late Baroque painters such as Bacciarelli himself, Grassi and Krafft, with a strong emphasis on historical and battle scenes.

Learn More
Polish Aviation Museum (Muzeum Lotnictwa Polskiego)

Polish Aviation Museum (Muzeum Lotnictwa Polskiego)

6 Tours and Activities

Located in what used to be a regional airport, the Polish Aviation Museum is indeed dedicated to old aircrafts, engines, and aviation history. The military airfield on which the museum is located is one of the oldest in the world, having been established by the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1912. It was soon used to train crews and repair aircrafts throughout the war; it became a major Polish Air Force Base until World War II, during which it was used by Germans to supply the Eastern front.

The rather large collection consists of over 200 aircraft, including several unique and extremely rare models from World War I, as well as a massive collection of archives and photographs; it, therefore, doesn’t come as a surprise to know that CNN deemed it the world’s eighth best aviation museum in the world.

Learn More
Archdiocesan Museum (Muzeum Archidiecezjalne w Krakowie)

Archdiocesan Museum (Muzeum Archidiecezjalne w Krakowie)

5 Tours and Activities

The Archdiocesan Museum of Cardinal Karol Wojtyla was originally founded in 1905, although not opened to the public until 1994. It was created to commemorate and advise the public of the artistic legacy of the Krakow bishopric. The buildings at 19 and 21 Kanonicza street that house the museum date to the late 14th century and today contains more than 600 works of art displayed in 16 rooms. The late Pope John Paul II, formerly known as Karol Wojtyla, resided there once as a young priest and again when he was the Archbishop of Krakow. The museum was named after him in 2005 and visitors are able to see the room where he lived from 1958 to 1967, as well as many of his personal effects, including his skis.

Museum displays showcase a variety of sacral art from the 13th to 18th centuries, including religious artifacts, sculptures and paintings. There is also a treasury of gifts presented to Archbishop from foreign heads-of-state and a set of furniture from 1905.

Learn More
Galicia Jewish Museum

Galicia Jewish Museum

5 Tours and Activities

Entirely dedicated to honoring Holocaust victims and celebrating Jewish culture of the former Austro-Hungarian region of Galicia through photographs, this museum features poignant and contemporary exhibits that will leave no one indifferent. It highlights a time in Poland when the Jewish community flourished, choosing to focus on what was and what remains, rather than on what was annihilated. The main exhibition, called Traces of Memory, presents the work of photojournalist Chris Schwarz and depicts what is left of the Austro-Hungarian’s heritage through photographs of cemeteries, houses, synagogues and other structures that are still visible today, and that once were at the heart of the Galician Jewish community; it also features video testimony of survivors. Additionally, the Museum also hosts two to three temporary exhibitions as well as concerts and other commemorative events.

Learn More
Museum of Photography in Krakow (Muzeum Fotografii w Krakowie)

Museum of Photography in Krakow (Muzeum Fotografii w Krakowie)

4 Tours and Activities

Welcome to Poland’s only photography museum! Although modest in size, the Photography History Museum will captivate shutterbugs of both amateur and professional levels, with its fascinating exhibitions that relate the development and evolution of the eight art. It features several compact rooms filled with ancient cameras (over 500, to be exact), various antique pieces of equipment, historical photographs of Krakow, and even an old darkroom. It also boasts an extensive collection of rare photographs, some dating as far back as the turn of the century. As the only one of its kind in the country, the museum is famous for housing temporary exhibits by famous photographers from around the world.

Learn More
St. Stanislaus Church (Skalka)

St. Stanislaus Church (Skalka)

7 Tours and Activities

The Skalka Sanctuary and St Stanislaw's Church are a Roman Catholic Church and monastery on the banks of the Vistula River in Krakow. The original Romanesque church which stood on this site was the place of one of Poland's crucial historic events - the murder of Stanislav, bishop of Krakow by the king, Boleslav. There are differing reasons why this happened but regardless, the people were not happy and Stanislav was eventually made a saint by Pope Innocent IV in 1253 - he has been called the saint of moral order. He was the first n ative Polish saint and remains patron saint of Poland. His relics are now in Wawel Cathedral.

The current Gothic church which stands on the site dates from the 14th century, with a Baroque update from the mid-18th century. Beginning in the 19th century, the church became a place for burial for well-known artists and writers, including Nobel Prize winning poet Czeslaw Milosz.

Learn More
Nowa Huta

Nowa Huta

star-4.5
15
4 Tours and Activities

Communist repression came to Poland in 1945 after the end of World War II and lasted until the collapse of the Iron Curtain in 1989. During this time, the suburb of Nowa Huta was constructed six miles (10 kilometers) east of Krakow’s center.

Nowa Huta could not be more different from fairytale Krakow. Built as a piece of Communist propaganda to “house the people” in a garden city, it sprang up at an alarming speed during the late 1940s. At its peak, the area housed 100,000 residents among its wide boulevards, public parks and regimented apartment blocks all designed in the architectural style of the day, Socialist Realism. As with many idealistic plans, the Soviet dream town was never completed, and Nowa Huta became a hotbed of political rebellion during the Solidarity strikes of the early 1980s.

Learn More