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Mount Robson Provincial Park and Protected Area
Mount Robson Provincial Park and Protected Area

Mount Robson Provincial Park and Protected Area

Free admission
7am - 11pm
Mount Robson Provincial Park, Jasper, Alberta

The Basics

Part of the UNESCO-recognized Canadian Rocky Mountains World Heritage Site, this park is a popular stop when heading to and from neighboring Jasper National Park. You can find ample opportunities for outdoor adventures including hiking, camping, white-water rafting, and mountaineering. The park is also a popular stop on group tours of the Canadian Rockies. Tours typically stop to enjoy views of Mount Robson along with visiting other attractions such as Spahat Falls and Maligne Canyon.

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Things to Know Before You Go

  • This free park offers a more affordable and less-crowded alternative to the nearby Jasper and Banff national parks.
  • Climbing Mount Robson is a feat that should only be attempted by experienced mountaineers.
  • Reservations are available for some campsites (reserve online) while others are first-come, first-served.
  • You can enjoy views of the mountain from the visitor center’s wheelchair-accessible deck.
  • Trails range from an easy, interpretive trail (navigable with strollers and wheelchairs) to challenging backcountry treks—offering something for everyone.
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How to Get There

Mount Robson Provincial Park and Protected Area is located along the Yellowhead Highway (Highway 16) about 50 miles (80 kilometers) west of Jasper. You can reach the park by car or avoid the hassle of driving and enjoy the views along the way by visiting on a group tour.

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When to Get There

The lower elevation portions of the park are generally snow-free and accessible from June through September. For the warmest weather and to explore higher elevation parts of the park, visit in July or August.

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Wildcard

Hiking the Berg Lake Trail Set in the shadow of Mount Robson, the Berg Lake Trail is one of the most popular multi-day treks in the Canadian Rockies. The 13-mile (21-kilometer) route includes rivers, glacial lakes, wildlife, and waterfalls. The trail attracts hikers from across the globe and potential trekkers must obtain a permit via an online system. You must plan ahead as permits are limited and often get booked up nearly a year in advance.

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