Recent Searches
Clear
Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park
Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park

Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park

Lasseter Highway, Yulara, 0872

The Basics

The traditional owners of Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park run walking tours through the site and co-manage the park’s cultural center, which provides valuable insights into the land’s significance for the Anangu culture. Browse traditional carvings, paintings, and ceramics made by central Australia’s Anangu communities.

Along with a sunrise or sunset viewing of Ayers Rock and the Olgas, explore the park on foot or via helicopter, bike, or motor coach; check out traditional activities such as boomerang throwing; or see the park through the eyes of the Anangu on a cultural excursion.

Show all

Things to Know Before You Go

  • Wear long, lightweight clothing (and possibly a head net) to protect yourself from the sun and insects. Flies especially can be a nuisance.

  • Climbing Ayers Rock is discouraged by the Anangu, as Uluru is sacred ground.

  • Avoid photographing certain sections of Uluru (clearly marked).

Show all

How to Get There

Located outside Yulara, Uluru is about 276 miles (445 kilometers) southwest of Alice Springs, and 11 miles (18 kilometers) south of the Ayers Rock Resort. There are direct flights to Yulara from Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane, and other cities.

Show all

Trip ideas


When to Get There

The best time to visit Uluru-Kata Tjuta National Park is between May and September, when the weather is the most pleasant and there are fewer flies. October to March is often extremely hot.

Show all

Why Is the Land Sacred?

The Anangu people, who belong to the oldest culture known to humankind, believe that the spirits of ancestral beings inhabit Uluru. Today, the Anangu continue to live by the ancient laws and traditions passed down from their ancestors. Stories and ceremonies are associated with specific sites, making them sacred and off-limits to tourists.

Show all